Tuesday, November 2, 2021

November 2021

November 27th 2335 GMT Betelguese and Meteor Hunt

 

It was clear after a cloudy and wet day but very cold. I saw Betelguese and compared it with Procyon, Rigel and Aldebaran. It was about magnitude 0.3.

I then set a camera to take 6 second exposures at ISO 6400 and 18mm focal length.

I stacked ten early shots to show Orion and Canis Minor.


At 2350 GMT, I caught a bright meteor with a short trail and deduced that it was probably a Northern Taurid.


I stacked a later set of 10 images where Gemini 
had joined Orion and Canis Minor.


 At 0049 GMT, I caught a mystery object near Castor and Pollux in Gemini.


 I stacked another set of frames to show  Gemini with Canis Minor.


                             

November 26th  Moon  Reprocess                           


I reprocessed another shot from November 3rd 2020.



November 25th 0600 GMT Moon

I snapped the Moon in the morning before going to work, using my DSLR at 300mm  focal length, ISO 100 and 1/160 second exposure.



November 23rd 0700 GMT Moon

I snapped the Moon in the morning before going to work, using my DSLR at 300mm  focal length, ISO 100 and 1/200 second exposure.


       

November 22nd 2130 GMT Moon

The clear day turned into a cloudy evening but I managed to catch the evening moon using the same settings as for the morning shoot.



November 22nd 1700 GMT Venus

Before leaving work, it was deep into twilight and I photographed Venus at 300mm focal length, ISO 100 and 1/200 second exposure. The phase change since my last photo was obvious.
                                    


November 22nd 0725 GMT Moon

 

I arrived at work and the Moon was still high in the west. I snapped it with the same setup as the evening before.



November 21st 2000 GMT Moon

You may have noticed that four days had passed since my last photo or observation and I had not done any reprocesses. For those unfortunate enough to suffer my books, I updated my "Webcamming" booklet but did not feel totally happy with it. I decided that it needed some information about processing. I did not feel quite in the right headspace for that but did a lot on my annual summary "2021 An Astronomer's Year", which I hope to release in January.

So, reading my last entry for Nov 17th, the Moon was the only credible object. I used the usual settings of 300mm focal length, ISO 100 and 1/200 second exposure. Even though it sounds big-headed, I thought "that'll do".


             
                                                   

November 17th 2215 GMT Moon 

 

The day was clearer than the day before but a mackerel sky accompanied the sunset and evening. I snapped the Moon at 300mm focal length, ISO 100 and 1/200 second exposure, as the evening before. I could not see Betelguese and there was no chance of seeing any meteors. The Moon was the only credible object.




November 16th 2235 GMT Moon and Betelguese

 

After a cloudy and wet day, it finally cleared somewhat to reveal a waning gibbous moon. I snapped it at 300mm focal length, ISO 100 and 1/200 second exposure.

 


 

Procyon was not visible but I was able to see Rigel, Aldebaran, Pollux and Capella. It was hard to discern whether Betelguese was as bright as Rigel, due to the difference in elevation. Nevertheless, I estimated its magnitude at 0.2.


November 16th Moon Reprocess

It had been 5 days of hurt with no live actions so, I reprocessed a lunar image from February 2nd 2020.



November 15th Sun Reprocess

With  persistent cloud continuing, I reprocessed a solar image from December 1st 2020.



November 14th Moon Reprocess

With another few days of persistent cloud, I reprocessed a lunar image from December 1st 2020.



November 11th 1930 GMT Moon and Jupiter

The Moon and Jupiter were visible in the night sky in hazy conditions, I caught the Moon on camera but the result was poor.


I used a wider field of view (70mm focal length) and two different expoosues to catch the Moon with Jupiter.



November 11th Jupiter's Moons Shot Reprocess 

With another day of thick cloud, I reprocessed a shot of Jupiter's moons from September 1st 2020.



November 10th Moon Shot Reprocess 

 

I processed a lunar shot from September 1st 2020. as I had a few days of bad weather.























































































































































































































































































































































November 7th 1050 GMT Sun

 

Conditions were hazy but a large sunspot was visible on the Learmonth images.

I increased my exposure time with my DSLR and filter to 1/500 second.








November 5th 1050 GMT Sun

There was some thin cloud around but I had a go at photographing the Sun 

anyway with my DSLR and filters, using my normal settings.





November 4th 2300 GMT Betelguese

 

Before bedtime, I saw that Orion had cleared the horizon. Procyon was not visible, so I used Rigel, Aldebaran 

and Capella to estimate its brightness, so arrived at a magnitude of 0.3.



November 4th 2015 GMT Meteor Hunt



I was planning to spend some time with my wife, so tried a different approach. I set my DSLR at 18mm focal length, 

ISO 800 and 30 seconds exposure. I aimed at Perseus, as the evening before, with the hope of getting one or 

both Taurid meteoroid streams.


I processed the first shot to show Cassiopeia and Perseus.



Unfortunately, I was unable to capture any meteors


November 4th 2000 GMT

 

I did a short photo shoot at 300mm focal length, ISO 6400 and 2 seconds exposure.

 

Targets were:

 

Jupiter’s Moons




 

Pleaides (M45)




 

Melotte 20



November 4th 1220 GMT Sun

 

I snapped the Sun with my DSLR and filters at 300mm focal length, ISO 100 and 1/2000 second exposure.



November 2nd 2041 GMT Meteor Hunt

I went for my usual meteor hunting set-up of 18mm focal length, ISO 6400 and 6 seconds exposure, set on repeat.

I processed a single early frame to reveal several winter constellations in their entirety and parts of others.


At 2240 GMT, I saw a "guest star". I zoomed in and found it looked like a broken trail. It is difficult to speculate what it was.


After the Earth rotated, Taurus was fully visible and I processed a shot.




November 2nd 1230 GMT Sun

 

The Learmonth and Big Bear images were showing some small sunspots. I tried to catch them with my DSLR and filter set at 300mm focal length, ISO 100 and 1/2000 second exposure. However, I did not detect any.



November 2nd 0555 GMT Moon and Beletguese

 

I revisited the Moon and Betelguese, having followed them at times during October.

 

The Moon was a thin waning crescent and I photographed it at 300mm focal length, ISO 100 and 1/250 second exposure.



Estimating the magnitude of Betelguese was rather tricky. Superficially, it was slightly fainter than Procyon but much brighter than Aldebaran. It seemed a little brighter than Rigel but Rigel appeared fainter than Procyon, mainly due to extinction near the horizon. I settled for an estimate of 0.4.

Saturday, October 2, 2021

October 2021

October 31st 1115 GMT Sun and Moon

 

The waning crescent moon was getting more slender and nearer to the Sun. I snapped it with my DSLR at 300mm focal length, ISO 100 and 1/200 second exposure.



 

 

I then added my full-aperture Baader solar filter to the set-up and reduced the exposure time to 1/2000 second exposure.



October 30th 0930 GMT Sun and Moon

There were some clear spells and I managed to do a quick photo shoot before cloud rolled in again. I snapped the Sun with my DSLR at 300mm focal length, ISO 100 and 1/1000 second exposure. I caught a faint imprint of some small sunspots.


The Moon shot was more successful, capturing the waning crescent phase and its craters. I used my DSLR at b300mm focal length, ISO 400 and 1/200 second exposure.



October 26th Cassiopeia Reprocessed

With wall-to-wall cloud, I revisited some photos from August 1st 2020. I used the Exposure function in GIMP and adjusted the brightness and contrast.



October 25th 0450 GMT Betelguese and Moon

 It was cloudy when I got up but cleared after Breakfast. I checked Betelguese and confirmed its magnitude of 0.5. This confirmed that it had faded quite rapidly but seemed to have stabilised.

I also snapped the waning gibbous moon at 300mm focal length, ISO 100 and 1/200 second exposure.



October 24th 1725 GMT Venus

After another wet and cloudy day, there was a clear spell after sunset. I photographed Venus with my DSLR at 300mm focal length, ISO 100 and 1/200 second exposure. It showed a clear gibbous phase.



October 24th Reprocess

I had wall-to-wall cloud on Friday and Saturday, so reprocessed an old Moon shot from August 1st 2020.


I also composed an image with the Moon and Jupiter's moons, using the above photo and two more.



October 21st 2020 GMT Moon

The conditions had deteriorated by nightfall, so I was met with strong moonlight, scattered by thin cloud. There were only two sensible photographic targets, the Moon and Jupiter. As I had not unpacked and stored any telescopes, I just tried to snap Jupiter's moons, in addition to our own. It was one of those all-too-frequent days where it was a case of struggling to get anything at all, rather than shooting a lot of deep sky and constellation images.

I snapped the Moon at 300mm focal length, ISO 100 and 1/250 second.


Despite getting a clear shot at Jupiter, I managed to capture only one moon, although I caught a few background stars.



October 21st 1130 GMT Sun

Fortunately, the clear sky continued to lunchtime and I snapped the Sun with the same settings as the day before.



October 21st 0640 GMT Moon

The Moon was up but behind cloud before I left for work. It was appearing and disappearing on the way to work but I played Russian Roulette with my journey and arrival time and stopped in a layby while conditions looked stable. The Moon was lower in the sky and thought it would set before I reached work. With observations and photos being sparse during the month, I just had to take the shot. I used 300mm focal length, ISO 100 and 1/250 second exposure.



October 20th 1055 GMT Sun

I had seen a sunspot on the Learmonth and Big Bear images and snapped the Sun at 300mm focal length, ISO 100 and 1/2000 second exposure. I had established it as my "go to" method, using filters. The weather was not good but I managed to find a gap in the cloud.



October 16th 1830 GMT Moon

Conditions were rather poor, with few stars showing and even Saturn was clouded out. I snapped the Moon at 300mm focal length, ISO 100 and 1/200 second exposure. Even then, it was under-exposed and it needed some processing to bring out the detail.




October 15th Lunar Reprocess from June1st 2000

I reprocessed an old moon shot to bring out more detail.



October 13th 1440 GMT Sun

I snapped the Sun at 300mm focal length, ISO 100 and 1/2000 second exposure. The large sunspot was about to rotate to the far side of the Sun.



October 13th Lunar Reprocess from May 1st 2000

I reprocessed an old daylight moon shot to bring out more detail.





October 11th 1800 GMT Moon

 

The Moon was low down in the west. There was cloud around and it obscured Venus. I used my DSLR at 300mm focal length, ISO 100 and 1/125 second exposure.


I also caught some hint of equatorial cloud belts on Jupiter.



October 11th 0500 GMT Betelguese

 

I had a quick look at the dawn sky and Betelguese seemed to have brightened to about magnitude 0.2.


October 10th 1120 GMT Sun

This image was not quite so sharp but clearly showed the rotation of the sunspot since my last photo.




October 6th 1210 GMT Sun

I managed a nice, sharp sunspot image at 300mm focal length, ISO 100 and 1/2000 second exposure.




October 5th 1935 GMT Meteor Hunt

I had a bit of clear sky but was busy, so set my camera to detect Draconid meteors at 18mm focal length, ISO 6400  and 6 seconds exposure.

At 1940 GMT,  I caught a nice shot of Ursa Minor, with parts of Draco.


At 2020 GMT, the constellations rotated to show Vega in the field of view.


At 2035 GMT, a short but bright meteor trail appeared near Ursa Minor.


At 2107 GMT, I saw a bright "guest star" near Polaris. It was quite bright, about magnitude 1.5. My immediate thought was another head-on meteor but when I zoomed in, the track was curved! No extravagant claims of little green men but  wondered what it was.


At 2111 GMT, I saw a bright, broken trail in Draco towards the bottom left.


At 2131 GMT, a similar event occurred but, this time, it was near a star.


I was excited when I found what looked like a meteor at 2154 GMT but closer inspection showed it to be a broken trail.







October 5th 0745 GMT Sun 

I snapped the Sun at the more sensible settings of 300mm focal length, ISO 100 and 1/1000 second exposure. I caught new sunspot activity but only just.


  


October 3rd 0950 GMT Sun and Moon

The waning crescent moon was thin but high in the south. I snapped it at 300mm focal length, ISO 400 and 1/80 second exposure.

I accidentally used the same settings for the Sun but took further shots at 300mm focal length, ISO 100 and 1/1000 second exposure.

Unfortunately, no shots worked.

October 1st Jupiter's Moons and Deep Sky

It was nice to start the month with all four of the moons discovered by Galileo on show.  I used my normal settings.


I snapped the Hyades at 70mm focal length, ISO 6400 and 8 seconds exposure.

     
I used the same settings for the Pleiades (M45).


I went for the Pleiades (M45) at 300mm focal length and 2 seconds exposure. Although I captured stars, I had much better results in the past.